Thursday, June 5, 2014

Don Rogers

The Harris County Criminal Justice world was shocked on Tuesday by the unexpected passing of former-defense attorney and Appellate Division prosecutor, Don Rogers.  Don passed away at his home of natural causes.

During our time of overlap at the Office, I did not know Don well, but he seemed like a very nice man from the little that I did know.  My friends in the Appellate and Writs Division, as well as the rest of the Office and the Defense Bar have written many kind things expressing their sadness and surprise at his loss.

Don was in private practice as a trial and appellate attorney for twenty years before joining the District Attorney's Office in 2000.  Part of his impressive career included working for legendary defense attorney Racehorse Haynes from 1994 until 2000.  He even served on the board of directors for the Harris County Criminal Lawyers Association.

The arrangements are still pending for his services and I will keep you updated as they become available.

3 comments:

Jigmeister said...

Don was my go to egg head for the last 5 years or so of my career. Really brilliant and great guy. RIP buddy.

Anonymous said...

Slow talking Don Rogers. I always thought that Don gave more thought to what and how he was going to say something than most people give to how they are going to write a pleading or brief. He was a go to guy who was always ready to help and solid in his advise. A great loss for the office and the bar.

Anonymous said...

The Harris County criminal appellate bar, both prosecution and defense, has been fortunate over the years to have many talented and outstanding attorneys. Clearly, Don Rogers was one of those attorneys. I knew Don Rogers as a friend for over forty years, first as a fellow criminal defense attorney, then as an adversary, and finally as a fellow prosecutor. I was pleased when he sought employment with the HCDAO. Don was a talented writer and thorough researcher. The Houston Bar and particularly the HCDAO will miss his advocacy, but more importantly will miss him, the person.
Calvin A. Hartmann